Pokémon GO – Your Answer to Exercise Resistance?

Pokémon GO! Could it be the key to motivation to exercise for ADHD children and adults?

Pokémon GO! is sweeping the nation as it is released in the UK today, but children are not the only ones giving it a try. Could it help motivate those of us who really struggle to find exercise enjoyable to get outside and start walking?

Admittedly, this is not the post I was expecting to write today for ADHD Mum of Three, as a respectable and responsible 36 year old mother surely I should be groaning at the thought of another app that is going to drain the hours out of the lives of my children, and let’s be honest, my life too.

I am a gamer, I always have been, it gets my brain working, I get drawn in and time disappears. We call games ‘time vampires’ in our house, and I was in two minds as to whether or not to download Pokémon GO or not as I was a huge fan of Pokémon games when they first came out in the 1990’s.

However, I have been trying to get more exercise recently, I joined Weight Watchers a little while ago and exercise is one of the things that is really promoted. I did well over the first two or three weeks, I bought a fitbit, just the little zip one, and I started going on walks in parks and countryside nearby. I was excited to get my first badges awarded on fitbit, and it helped my weight loss, but alas, my motivation started to fade.

It was just a bit too boring to be honest, I had a couple of particular places to walk but even on a sunny day I was finding it more of a frustration to drive there, walk the same route and see the same trees and flowers. I need something more, I’m terrible at appreciating natural beauty. It takes less than two minutes looking at a sunset or at beautifully landscaped gardens before my brain thinks ‘done that, what next…’. I’m a nightmare in museums!

So, would Pokémon GO be a possible answer to my problems?

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Adult ADHD Online Shopping Tips

Adult ADHD Online Shopping Tips Save Money Online and Avoid Common Pitfalls of Impulse Spending

Follow these Online Shopping Tips to Save Money and Avoid the Common ADHD Pitfalls of Impulse Buying!

There are plenty of ways to save money online but those of us with ADHD need to approach with caution! If you have read my post about saving money in-store then you will know that the biggest pitfall for shopping is impulse buying, we love a good bargain!

Shopping online is great for those of us who struggle to negotiate big stores, who feel anxious and stressed at the thought of going out into the throng of people all filling their trolleys, particularly if we have to shop at peak times when just finding a space in the car park can be a challenge.

There’s an incredible range of products available online too, pretty much anything you can think of is available somewhere and you don’t have to worry about shopping at unsocial hours. The shops are always open and there’s always a ‘Sale!’ on somewhere.

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Symptoms Checklist for Diagnosis of ADHD

ADHD Symptoms Checklist - Diagnostic Criteria

What are the main ADHD Symptoms and How do they Diagnose ADHD?

To obtain an ADHD diagnosis you must speak to a health professional, the usual first step would be to speak to your GP. If there is enough evidence to seek a referral you will then be referred to a specialist or consultant who will be able to assess and diagnose ADHD. Unfortunately in the UK there is a real need for ADHD specialists and waiting list times can be in excess of 18 months after referral.

At your first appointment the specialist will ask you a series of questions about ADHD symptoms that you may have now, and that you may remember experiencing as a child. I actually took along my mum to the appointment so that she could answer questions about my childhood that I struggle to remember. You may also be asked to complete a number of questionnaires to aid the consultant in reaching a diagnosis.

In the case of a child referral to a Community Paediatrician is usually made rather than a specific ADHD specialist. This means shorter referral times and the Paediatrician will have a broad knowledge of a number of conditions which may exhibit similar symptoms to ADHD. It is usual for the school setting to be involved in diagnosis, the Paediatrician may carry out observations in the school setting and the school will be asked to fill out a questionnaire to assess the symptoms of the child. The same questionnaire will be given to the parents/carer to assess symptoms shown in the home setting and these will be compared.

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Executive Functions in a Nutshell

ADHD Executive Functions Planning Lists Organisation Memory

You may have heard the term Executive Functions if you’ve been starting to research into ADHD, or you may, like me, have assumed that Executive Functions had something to do with Business Conferences. My doctor had certainly never mentioned them, and I guess Biology lessons didn’t really cover cognitive functioning in any great detail.

So what are Executive Functions?

Simply put Executive Functions are the processes in your brain to get things done.

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ADHD can affect any combination of these functions which is why you might start lots of projects, but never get them finished. I like craft hobbies, I love starting them, I love buying all the shiny new kit and caboodle, I love finishing my first piece and looking at my big stash of projects that I’m going to do next. Then I love something else. It is expensive, it is infuriating to those around me and it makes me feel guilty!

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