Signs of Inattentive ADHD – A Guide for Teachers, TAs and Other Professionals

Inattentive PI ADHD Classroom Identify List

Inattentive ADHD Can Be Overlooked in the classroom as it is Less VISIBLE than COMBINED or Hyperactive/ Impulsive ADHD

Around 5% of children are affected by ADHD, at a ratio of 2:1 girls to boys according to the DSM-5.1 Girls are more likely to present with Predominantly Inattentive ADHD (ADHD PI) whereby the child is not as likely to be a disruptive influence in the classroom as a child with Predominantly Hyperactive/Impulsive ADHD (ADHD PH/I), or classic ADHD, may be.

The signs of ADHD PI are much harder to spot because generally these children are trying to ‘fit in’ with their peers, not wishing to draw attention to themselves as they feel like they are not  achieving as well as they could do. I’ve heard children as young as 8 say that they don’t want to be ‘found out’ because people think they’re bright, but really they feel stupid because they keep making mistakes and feel like they need to try harder.

I wrote in my article about growing up with Inattentive ADHD that I felt invisible and in some ways that was what I was aiming for when I was younger, I didn’t want to stand out. I coasted through school managing to do fairly well but I could have achieved more if someone had been able to explain to me that my brain worked differently to my peers and that trying to be like them wasn’t going to solve all of my problems.

Medication could have helped with some of my symptoms, helping me to focus in lessons, and extra time in exams may have helped, but I think, more importantly, understanding why I couldn’t seem to do things like everyone else would have made a huge difference. I wasn’t just lazy or stupid, I was trying as hard as I could and every failure felt enormous, even if it was getting 9/10 on a maths test. Support from a teacher or another professional would have meant learning techniques and strategies to manage my time, organise my things and how to manage my emotions and build up my self-esteem.

colourband

Continue reading

Why Inattentive ADHD Often Goes Unnoticed

Inattentive ADHD Classroom Child School Identify

Girls with ADHD are less likely to be diagnosed because they are more likely to present with Inattentive Symptoms

According to the DSM-5 ADHD affects about 5% of children but occurs in boys more than girls at a ration of 2:1.2

Often girls with ADHD stay ‘under the radar’ in the classroom because girls are more likely to have the Predominantly Inattentive Presentation of ADHD, rather than Combined or Predominantly Hyperactive/Impulsive Presentation. See my guide here to understand the terms and to gain an overview of the different symptoms that are linked to each presentation.

I was one of those girls, albeit at a time before there had not been as much research into ADHD – particularly in the UK. That’s me in the photograph up there, ironically highlighted when the reality was just the opposite. I am 7 years old in that picture and in the equivalent class of Year 3. That year my parents would be told at parent’s evening that I was a daydreamer, I never seemed to be listening and I wouldn’t finish my work as quickly as other children. I could do better if I just applied myself, if I just made more effort. I didn’t look particularly different and I certainly didn’t know I was different, I just though I was bad.

colourband

Continue reading